What is Native Advertising?

 

Native advertising is an online advertisement technique that involves the creation of paid adverts made to blend in with the rest of the content within the platform on which they are displayed. The aim of this method of advertisement is to get the message about a product or business brand out to the target audience, without interfering with the user experience on the platform used to display the advert.

Native Advertisement Forms

Native advertisements can come in many forms. You can use some of these forms to your advantage. Examples are outlined below.

·         Native adverts on social media platforms include promoted Twitter tweets and sponsored stories on Facebook.

·         The “Related Articles” section of major blogs or sites are often paid adverts incorporated to appear as a continuation of whatever the user is reading.

·         Splashy ads on major sites and blogs that appear to reflect the topic being discussed are also native ads.

·         Sponsored content created to appear like the rest of the content on major news sites and other platforms is also a form of native advertisement.

Native ad content does not have to be in text form. It can be in form of infographics, videos, and images. Even music and commentary posted on a site can be a form of native advertising.

Native Advertising Platforms

Native advertising platforms are either open or closed. Some are hybrids of the two.

1.     Open Platforms

Open platforms allow your branded content to be promoted both locally and across multiple platforms.

2.     Closed Platforms

Closed platforms restrict the native ad formats that you can use to market your brand. The content will follow a specific format. It can only be promoted within the platform for which it was originally intended. For example, promoted tweets on Twitter cannot be marketed across other platforms like Facebook or Pinterest.

The Benefits of Native Advertising

While some people might consider native advertising as a sneaky way to advertise, the benefits of this marketing method cannot be underestimated.

1.     Better Viewer Reception

Internet users no longer like traditional online banners and other aggressive marketing forms. Most of them are turned off by such in-your-face methods of marketing.

Since native adverts blend in so well with the content that Internet users are already interested in seeing, they are received better. This is a good thing. The positive reception makes it easier for you to get your marketing message across. It will be much easier then, for you to persuade your target audience to buy your products.

2.     Wider Reach

Native advertising allows you to reach to a wider audience that is far removed from your site. This is because you can advertise on bigger platforms including mobile platforms, as long as the advert meets the set criteria. A wider audience means more potential customers that you can advertise to, to help generate additional sales and revenues.

3.     Higher Returns on Investments (ROI)

Long after your blog posts are out of style, your native ads will still be attracting potential customers. In addition, you have a much better chance of getting good leads and converting them.

All these positive results can be done for a fair price. For that reason, native advertising offers you the chance to get your money’s worth. The potential return of investment can be quite high, and could do wonders for the bottom line of your business.

 

 

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